Common Misconceptions About Flood Insurance

Homeowners and business owners alike have concerns about water damage related to flooding. This is especially true if they live in an area prone to flooding. However, there are numerous myths circulating about flood insurance that add further confusion to this type of coverage. For example, many individuals think of flood damage as a total loss, but the average flood claim is around $30,000. Below are some of the most common myths about flood insurance.

Only People Living in a Flood Plain Can Buy Flood Insurance

While mortgage companies may require people who live in a flood zone to purchase flood insurance, these individuals are not the only ones who can buy this kind of coverage. Almost anybody who wants flood insurance can obtain a policy. In general, properties in flood zones are more expensive to insure than those that are not. Even renters can obtain flood insurance to protect their belongings.

Flood Insurance is Only Necessary for Properties in Flood-Prone Areas

While properties in flood plains need flood insurance, all buildings face a certain level of flooding risk. About 25 percent of flood claims come from individuals who do not live in a flood plain. Property owners should take a hard look at the risk of flooding in their area and investigate what flood insurance options are available to them.

Individuals with Homeowners Insurance Do Not Need Flood Insurance

This myth can cost homeowners big time in the event of a flood. Homeowners and umbrella policies do not cover damage related to floods. If an individual lives in an area prone to flooding, they should invest in flood insurance. The one exception to this rule is storm damage. If a storm tears off a portion of a house’s roof, homeowners insurance covers the subsequent water damage.

Learning about your flood risk and if you live in a flood plain are vital to determining if you need this type of insurance. These factors also affect how much coverage you will need. To learn more about flood insurance, contact The Reilly Company.

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